From Pizza Night to Crazy Saturday Schedule

Day 6 in Eat Local Challenge Series

If the title of my Day 6 post didn’t give it away, there is too much going on today with our kids, soccer and school to put deep thought into a post. I have captured last night’s incredible Pizza Night and scrumptious dessert, as well as our protein-packed Saturday morning breakfast, along with links to more outstanding Vermont farms and food processors.

As the Eat Local Challenge winds down (we will be going through tomorrow since we got a late start), I am finding myself thinking reflectively about what me and my family have experienced and learned during this incredible week. I’ve also been envisioning how I would improve the Eat Local Challenge so that it considers the many little challenges one faces in eating local in Vermont.

With that in mind, please stay tuned for tomorrow’s 10 Joys of Eating Local and Monday’s 5 Ways to Improve Eat Local Challenges. They are already outlined and being turned over again and again in my head, but given the day me and my family have ahead of us, they will have to wait for more concentrated time.

Besides, it is an incredibly beautiful fall day in Vermont and I (surprising even to me) don’t want to be behind a keyboard when I can be outside sucking up as much sunshine and fresh air as I can.

Cheers!

Today’s Localvore Meals

  • Breakfast: This morning’s breakfast was designed to energize the family for a crazy mid day frenzy (soccer, school event, etc.). We served scrambled eggs (from local, free range chickens, of course) made with Strafford Organic Creamery (Strafford) Half and Half, Grafton Village cheddar cheese and Nardello peppers from our garden, along with Cob Smoked, Thick Sliced, Maple Cured Bacon from Vermont Smoke & Cure (South Barre) and Cold Hollow Cider Mill (Waterbury) apple cider. We ran out of our homemade local bread, so there was no toast (bummer). We will begin lobbying Red Hen Baking Co. (Middlesex), Manghi’s (Montpelier) and other local bakers to make more localvore breads before next year’s challenge!
  • Lunch: Today’s lunch will be a smorgasborg of (hopefully) local eats, as soccer and school activities have us running around from mid morning to mid afternoon. Some of us have packed snacks (I wasn’t fortunate enough to get leftover pizza) from our “Eat Local” fridge, but there will be other foods that may be too good to pass by. Of course, we will all try our best to keep on the local path (although my 13 year old daughter may stray a bit).
  • Dinner (Previous Night):  Pizza Night at the Smart home has always included homemade crust, along with lots of fresh produce from our garden and Wellspring Farm. With the local challenge, we opted for a whole wheat crust using Gleason Grains whole wheat flour and honey from Bee Haven Honey Farm. It was fantastic all by itself, but then we threw on top tomatoes, peppers and onions from our garden, Sweet Italian Sausage from Vermont Smoke & Cure and handmade Cherrywood Smoked Mozarella from Maplebrook Farm in Bennington, which placed 2nd at the 2009 American Cheese Society Conference (well deserved).
  • Dessert: Caramelized Apple Tart with Cinammon Custard (slightly modified for Challenge) from Deborah Madison’s Local Flavors (link contains original recipe and cookbook review). Very good!
  • Wild Cards: French Roast Coffee, olive oil on pizza, Vermont wine (last night we had enjoyed, for the first time, a bottle of Cabernet Franc from East Shore Vineyard in Grand Isle)
  • Exceptions: Crushed red pepper (from bulk section of Hunger Mt. Co-op), vanilla extract (also from Hunger Mt. Co-op bulk section)

Related Posts:

  • Day 1 – Refrigerator & Pantry Stocked for Local Eating Challenge
  • Day 2 – Wrapping Our Heads around Eating Local
  • Day 3 – Thinking “Eat Local” Season v. Single Week
  • Day 4 – Seeing Shades of Local Food
  • Day 5 – Downsides to Eating Local?

3 responses to “From Pizza Night to Crazy Saturday Schedule

  1. I’m all for eating locally, and I sell locally as well. There is one time that complicates it. Crop failure. This year our potato and tomato crops failed completely. Our pumpkin and squash crops were almost a complete loss. Out of over 200 pumpkin plants I got seven puny pumpkins. Tomatoes and potatoes are normally a mainstay of our diet. We also normally eat a lot of pumpkin in the winter and feed it to the livestock. On the other hand the apple crop is doing well this year, broccoli, turnips and beets faired well. The corn crop was a complete loss, well almost – we got three ears. This is the fourth year in a row the corn has failed with the seed rotting in the ground.

    Each year has its ups and downs. Diversity is key.

    • Great comments Walter. Thank you. My family grew what was easily our largest vegetable and herb garden ever (~500 square feet). Small by farm standards, of course, but we went for a highly diverse set of crop (around 40 varieties). Like you, we lost a lot of tomatoes, and didn’t get nearly the number of zucchini and cucumber we had expected. We won’t reduce the diversity next year, but will narrow the types of crops, and expect to add chickens.

  2. Pingback: 10 Joys of Eating Local « Every Kitchen Table

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